Tag Archives: workflow

Strategic Foresight: Future of a Turkey

turkey1Your Thanksgiving Day turkey takes a journey to get to your table! Many people along the way have already planned and implemented with the future in mind to make the turkey available for purchase—and then—cooks at home use strategic foresight for the advance organizing of the festive turkey meal! Consider the four day weekend associated with Thanksgiving: travel to and from a destination, the special meal, the football games, the activities on the day after Thanksgiving, and the weekend that follows. Many households plan the Thanksgiving meal weeks ahead. Agendas for visiting family and friends are carefully arranged, sometimes down to the hour. Shopping and activities entail schedules. To top it off, travel for the Sunday after Thanksgiving is declared heaviest of the year by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, with 13.7 million long-distance trips.

In the midst of most Thanksgiving plans one will find a special bird—the turkey. If one applies strategic foresight and end-visioning to the preparation of the Thanksgiving turkey, it’s sure to be a success. Furthermore, one can use this process of planning for any other aspect of the Thanksgiving festivities. Take advantage of this enthusiastic holiday planning approach to catalyze your everyday work, life and leadership, too! Here’s how…

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All That Work You Do

Piles of PaperworkDo you live for 5 p.m. when “work” is over and “life” resumes? Think again. Life happens at work, and more so than ever. Americans spend more time—living and breathing at work—than any other people on our planet. According to International Labor Organization research, “Americans work 137 more hours per year than Japanese workers, 260 more hours per year than British workers, and 499 more hours per year than French workers.” Financial advisor G.E. Miller reveals: “The U.S. is the most overworked developed nation in the world.” Facing the overwork reality, can we make business, or work, worth living? Our work investment of hours upon hours ought to be valuable and rewarding. But how?

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Operations that Work: Ensemble

jazz jpgHave you ever watched your favorite musical group perform? They look at each other, nod, gesture, smile—and sometimes speak! They’re intentionally connecting and communicating about the music they are creating together. This is called ensemble and the word literally means “together”. What a valuable skill, and one that is also present in all successful workplaces. Whether you’re in retail, manufacturing, professional service or non-profit organizations, working together well in ensemble means enjoying operations that work. What are some components of ensemble?

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Your Best Workflow

workflowWorkflow is the way things get done. It happens daily, whether we design it or not. It consists of the steps from start to finish of any given process; it could be laundry, ironing and storing clothes as well as printing and assembling documents at work, or manufacturing something on a large scale. Getting things done takes shape in our personal and work environments as productive, nonproductive, or worse—a waste of time. Why not design workflow to get the results we want?  Three things make a successful workflow:  a plan, the resources, and the people. Most leaders would be pleased if these three components were in place every time they started a project. The reality is that the perfect combination of these factors rarely occurs on its own. Leaders must be creative, flexible, and resourceful to get the results they want through intentionally designing workflow.

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Design Your Workflow

Maze Puzzle (Blender)Workflow is the way things get done. It happens daily, whether we design it or not. It consists of the steps from start to finish of any given process; it could be laundry, ironing and storing clothes as well as printing and assembling documents at work. Getting things done takes shape in our personal and work environments as productive, nonproductive, or worse—a waste of time. So why not design workflow to get the results we want? Continue reading